<

PEOPLE

STAFF

PARTNERS

ASSOCIATE MEMEBERS 

ISABEL HOFMEYR

Isabel Hofmeyr is Professor of African Literature at the University of the Witwatersrand and Global Distinguished Professor at New York University. She has worked extensively on the Indian Ocean world and oceanic themes more generally. Recent publications include Gandhi’s Printing Press: Experiments in Slow Reading (2013) and a special issue of Comparative Literature (2016) on “Oceanic Routes”, co-edited with Kerry Bystrom.

isabel.hofmeyr@wits.ac.za

CHARNE LAVERY

Charne Lavery is a researcher based at WiSER, Wits. She completed her DPhil at the University of Oxford, and has worked as a lecturer in the Department of English at the University of Cape Town. Her research is in oceanic literary studies, particularly literary and cultural representations of the Indian, Southern and deep oceans.

 

charne.lavery@wits.ac.za

EUCLIDES GONÇALVES

Euclides Gonçalves is a researcher and director at Kaleidoscopio: Research in Public Policy and Culture, in Mozambique, as well as a research associate at the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research (WiSER)  in South Africa. His ethnographic research examines public encounters with bureaucratic power through the analysis of the performativity of documents. Currently, he is also coordinating a cultural heritage project that explores the meanings of memory associated with the Indian Ocean and the Slave Trade.


e.goncalves@kaleidoscopio.co.mz 

MARGARET COHEN

Margaret Cohen is the Andrew B. Hammond Professor of French Language, Literature and Civilization at Stanford University, where she is jointly appointed in Comparative Literature and English. Throughout her career, Professor Cohen has explored the literature and culture of modernity. In her most recent book, The Novel and the Sea (2010), she revealed the impact of the ship’s log and the history of writing about work at sea on the development of the modern novel. She is currently completing a book on the history of underwater film, examining how the modern imagination of the depths has been shaped by science and technology enabling people to view a hitherto inaccessible realm as well as to exhibit its conditions on land.

macohen@stanford.edu

Please reload